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Martin & Bonnett, Phoenix Employment Lawyers
A D V O C A T E S   F O R   E M P L O Y E E   R I G H T S   -   A C R O S S   T H E   U . S .
602-240-6900

Wage, Overtime and Employee Misclassification Cases

Minimum Wage and Overtime Claims for Salaried Employees and Hourly Workers

Cases and Investigations

Martin & Bonnett is currently litigating or investigating several industries and groups of employers for overtime, minimum wage, unlawful deductions, Fair Labor Standards Act, and other state and federal wage and employment law violations.

Many employers wrongfully misclassify employees as independent contractors and deprive them of wages, benefits and other legal protections to which employees are entitled. Some employers require employees to work “off the clock” or tell employees they are “exempt” from overtime when, in fact, they are entitled to it.

Martin & Bonnett has litigated or is currently litigating or investigating the following categories of employees:

  • Truck drivers
  • Delivery drivers
  • Assistant managers who have been classified as exempt from overtime 
  • Bank employees who have been classified as exempt from overtime
  • Call center and telemarketing employees
  • Customer service employees
  • Engineers
  • Hospital workers
  • Hotel workers
  • Loan officers and processors
  • Restaurant employees
  • Retail store employees
  • Factories requiring employees to wear protective clothing
  • Television and cable installers

If you would like more information, or you believe you are entitled to overtime or compensation that you have not received, contact our experienced FLSA overtime attorneys, at 602-240-6900 or 800-952-4750. You can also contact us using the form on our Contact Us page

Some of Our Notable Fair Labor Standards Act Cases

Wildflower Bread Company: Failure to Pay Overtime to Assistant Managers. Martin & Bonnett successfully resolved a collective and class action complaint brought on behalf of assistant managers for violations of the FLSA and state wage laws. We obtained back pay for the group of employees who joined the lawsuit.

Klement v. Sierra Vista Regional Health Center: Failure to Pay Overtime to Hospital Employees for On-Call and On-Premises Time. Martin & Bonnett successfully resolved a lawsuit challenging the failure to pay wages and overtime compensation for meal times and rest periods during which the employees were required to be on call.

Van Dusen v. Swift Transportation Company: Misclassification of Drivers as Independent Contractors. Martin & Bonnett, together with co-counsel, is currently challenging the classification of these truck drivers as independent contractors. For more information or to join the lawsuit, contact us.

Collinge v. Intelliquick Delivery Incorporated: Misclassification of Drivers as Independent Contractors. Martin & Bonnett is litigating a collective and class action lawsuit against Intelliquick on behalf of drivers whom Intelliquick misclassified as independent contractors. The complaint alleges that the drivers are employees, not independent contractors, and have been deprived of wages and benefits and subjected to unlawful deductions and other unlawful practices. The Court has ruled in favor of the drivers, finding that they are employees, not independent contractors. The cases is now in the phase of determining damages for the affected employees. For more information, contact us or visit www.iqlawsuit.com.

Central Refrigerated Service, Inc. and Central Leasing, Inc.: Misclassification of Drivers as Independent Contractors. Martin & Bonnett, together with co-counsel, has brought a class and collective action seeking minimum wages and damages and asserting that “owner-operators” are employees, not independent contractors. The arbitrator has ruled that these drivers are employees, not independent contractors. A trial on the issue of damages is scheduled in April. For more information, please contact us.

Swift Transportation: Martin & Bonnett, together with co-counsel, is litigating an employee misclassification case in federal court. The court has ruled that the drivers who leased trucks from a leasing company owned by Swift are employees who have contracts of employment with the defendants. That ruling is currently on appeal. 


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